History of America

American History

Imperialism

During the nineteenth century, the majority of the nations in Europe were on a quest to influence other territories both politically and economically. Imperialism aimed to gain territory resources, utilize the regions as military bases and trading regions and colonize the territories. Imperialism on other territories would deny the nations their sovereign rights to formulate their laws and utilize their resources in the best way they saw fit.

[1] Nye, Joseph S. Bound to Lead: The Changing Nature of American Power. New York: Basic Books, 2016.

Economic dominance in Latin America

Trade took root in both Central and Latin America. The trade escalated as a result of the bilateral economic treaties signed by both Central America and the Latin America nations. The treaties enable America to build a market for its manufactured goods and broaden its economic territory. America imported more of its raw materials from the territories and denied them the capability to develop their manufacturing industries. Most of the assets in Mexico were under the restraint of the Americans with heightened production rates of oil exceeding those of Mexico. America also imported more sugar to the United States, and the majority of imports to the islands originated from the United States.

[2] The United States also created a strong navy to colonize the Caribbean region. The regions would act as military bases and also points for coal collection. Colonization would guarantee America dominance over the Caribbean and Latin territories.

Political dominance in Cuba

America also took advantage of Cuban’s demand for independence. It forced the Spanish troops to withdraw from Cuba by declaring war on Spain. After the war, Spain signed an agreement with the United States where Spain gave Cuba independence and allowed the United States dominance over the Guantanamo Bay. They also gave the US Puerto Rico as a military base and a marketing base for their goods

.[3] For the United States to recall their military and transfer power to Cuba, it had to agree to avail land for the American military, allows the US to guard their interest in case any nation intervened and granted complete sovereignty over Guantanamo Bay.

Bibliography

Marks, Gary Wolfe. Unions in Politics: Britain, Germany, and the United States in the Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries. Princeton University Press, 2014.

Nye, Joseph S. Bound to Lead: The Changing Nature of American Power. New York: Basic Books, 2016.

[1] Nye, Joseph S. Bound to Lead: The Changing Nature of American Power. New York: Basic Books, 2016.

[2] Marks, Gary Wolfe. Unions in Politics: Britain, Germany, and the United States in the Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries. Princeton University Press, 2014.

[3] Nye, Joseph S. Bound to Lead: The Changing Nature of American Power. New York: Basic Books, 2016.

 

 

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