Employment at Will

     Employment at Will

Employment at Will is mostly used in contractual relationships where an employer can dismiss an employee for any reason and without warning. Employment at will is considered when the employee violates some terms of employment.  For example, if an employee asks for leave, but they end up extending the period, the employer can be compelled into hiring other personnel for the position (Kearney & Mareschal, 2014).  At- will employment usually does not apply to most of the issues that relate to the relationship in employment. It only applies to the duration at which the employee is employed.

The unity of workers highly fought employment at will in the unionized company. Workers joined together and fought for their rights in that they were not supposed to be dismissed from work without any properly scrutinized reason. If workers are dismissed, they are set to go through a long process of disciplinary action before the decision is effected (Holley, Jennings & Wolters, 2012).

Based on my research dismissal of an employee should be a carefully thought of course of action. Replacing an employee is easy but replacing the skill is much difficult and therefore cultivating and maintaining a healthy working relationship between managers and workers and taking into consideration employee’s dismissal procedure could be a noble act. Probations and setting up other disciplinary measures could be implemented instead of permanently terminating the services of personnel.

For the lawmakers, they should consider putting into laws the scenarios in which an employment at will is disciplined instead of considering some quantifying reasons (In Milkman & In Ott, 2014). They should also put into consideration the agreements that exist between the employer and the employer before a disciplinary action is taken. If a contract is violated the employees should be disciplined, but on situation whereby the agreements have not been violated the matter should be dealt with internally (Goodman & Cohen, 2017)

References

Goodman, D., & Cohen, G. (2017). Public Sector Employment at Will: A Critical Analysis of Ethical Concerns and Recommendations for Public Administrators. Public Integrity, 1-15.

Holley, W. H., Jr., Jennings, K. M., & Wolters, R. S. (2012). The labor relations process (10th ed.). Mason, OH: South-Western.

In Milkman, R., & In Ott, E. (2014). New labor in New York: Precarious workers and the future of the labor movement.

Kearney, R. C., & Mareschal, P. M. (2014). Labor relations in the public sector. crc Press.

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