Ethics and leadership

Ethics and leadership

Introduction

The ethics concept defines the acceptable morally upright way in a society. In essence, ethics deals with all the values that define an individual’s sense of purity including his or her particular intentions (Prince, 2008). This means that ethics plays a critical role of providing guidelines needed for analyzing what is right or wrong in particular scenarios. The study analyzes three articles that correlate ethics with leadership. The most common idea reflected in the three articles is the fact that ethics defines a leader’s specific identity as well as his or her role. For this reason, ethical theories mainly tend to discuss two main items. The main issues and themes discussed in the three articles are ethics, behavior and action of leaders followed by a leader’s character or personality. This paper will analyze these three articles, exploring how ethics are essential towards leadership or the role of leadership.

A critical role played by a leader is influencing or driving subordinates towards all processes that ultimately achieve common goals (Hassan, Mahsud, Yukl & Prussia, 2013). This is in various cases that include organizational quest, teamwork or a specific project. This means that a leader has the ethical duty of treating his subordinates with respect as every individual has unique personality and character. In addition, the ethical environment in a particular organization is established and built by leaders since they possess an influential role or responsibility in their specific organization. Besides, leaders are known to have an influential responsibility in the process of developing organizational values (Hassan et al., 2013).

In most organizations, the immediate supervisors to organizational employees are assumed the organization’s primary representatives. In this regard, such leaders tend to provide important roles such as feedback, daily direction, information regarding job descriptions, work groups as well as evaluation processes to organizational employees (Kotlke & Pelletier, 2013). Research studies have indicated several occasions where differences emerge in regards to the level of satisfaction or trust with immediate top executives or supervisors. This means that organizational employees tend to evaluate their leaders based on their ethical tendencies. Such differences are then indicated in specific organizationally relevant outcomes that are personal such as in both organizational citizenship and commitment.

Themes addressed in all of the Articles

The articles suggest that leaders’ level of integrity, honesty as well as trustworthiness are critical factors in predicting leadership effectiveness. Conceptualized ethical leadership is a demonstration to every normal and appropriate factor critical in conducting interpersonal relationships and personal actions (Kotlke & Pelletier, 2013). In addition, they play leading roles in promoting effective conducts in relevant followers through an established two-way communication, decision-making as well as reinforcement. The articles have also established the fact that ethical leadership is a composition of certain behaviors and traits.

In this regard, morally upright leaders are assumed sincere and principle based individuals who are able to care about their subordinates’, society’s and followers’ wellbeing.

Proactively, ethical leaders tend try to establish transformative processes in their subordinates through effective communication strategies as far as their ethical standards are concerned (Ciulla, 2004). This is modeling ethical behaviors that suggest that their subordinates or followers ought to be held accountable for their ethical actions or behaviors.

These articles also suggest that organization’s success is primarily based on the leader’s ability to foster an ethical culture in his or her organization. This is mainly achieved by the ability of articulating organizational values in an effective manner with the main aim of developing the subordinate’s moral culture by effectively implementing the strategies as well as tactics that are morally appropriate. Moreover, effective ethical leadership entails offering any support systems or mechanisms to employees when they are faced with challenges besides ethical dilemmas. The process is complemented by a leader’s ability to respond to any ethical misconduct in a timely fashion. This means that ethical leadership is composed with implementations of any processes that make ethics to be an organization’s top priority (Pelletier, 2013). Previous studies established that ethical leadership was a potential condition in regards to the effectiveness of an ethical program.

Ethical use of Power, Authority, Persuasion, and/or Motivation

It is important to note that differentiated perceptions normally vary from one employee to the other. Moreover, they may have significant implications on how ethical lapses may be avoided or eliminated in an organization. For instance, there have been suggestions that lower levels organizations face situation and abstract ethical dilemmas. This means that universal ethical codes may result to an impediment towards any good ethical decisions at such levels of an organization (Ciulla, 2004). Organizational employees at lower levels may also hold their supervisors or leaders to a universal code of ethics. However, they may also recognize that their own leaders or supervisors possess an ambiguous situation that is unique and which they have to cope with. In addition, any form of education or training in regards to ethical awareness, decision-making and knowledge may be found to be fundamentally different at lower employee levels relative to top leadership levels.

Empowering and ethical leader behaviors are mainly associated with relationships found to be high-quality leader affiliate exchange (LMX) (Hassan et al., 2013). There is increased likelihood that such relationships are founded on mutual liking, trust and respect. Various research studies based on LMX have been able to establish that most leaders possessing favourable exchange relationships and have the likelihood to be assumed more effective stimulate efficient sub-ordinate commitment. This is as opposed to leaders with exchange relationships that are negative or unfavorable. However, it is worth noting that previous studies did not seek to explore or investigate ethical or empowering leadership as a form of behavioral practice that is distinct and related to LMX (Hassan et al., 2013). This is despite the fact that such a relationship has a direct impact towards effective subordinate commitment as well as perceptions in regards to specific leader effectiveness in a variety of ways.

Most organizations tended to consider ethics programs as effective only when leaders were able to promote the culture of ethical dialog. This is because such a process resulted to the creation of a working environment of trust as well as the provision to resources that enabled the development of ethical decisions in an organization (Prince, 2008). The articles indicate that the process of seeking a social legitimacy is closely followed by the ability of organizational leaders to enhance an ethical culture. This is mainly when such organizations are faced with ethical misconducts at any level of leadership. In essence, ethical leadership is a critical tool towards the process of complementing decision-making processes, ethical codes as well as in obtaining organizational resources, which are essential to the process of achieving an ethical organizational culture.

References

Ciulla B. J. (2004). Ethics, the Heart of Leadership. London. Greenwood Publishing Inc.

Hassan S.,  Mahsud R.,  Yukl G. &  Prussia E. G. , (2013),”Ethical and empoweringleadership and leader effectiveness”, Journal of Managerial Psychology, Vol. 28 Iss 2 pp. 133 – 146Permanent link to this document:http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/02683941311300252

Pelletier K. (2013). Measuring and Differentiating Perceptions of Supervisor and Top Leader Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics. March 2013. DOI: 10.1007/s10551-012-1312-8

Prince. L. T. (2008). Leadership Ethics: An Introduction. London. Cambridge University Press.

Kottke, J., & Pelletier, K. (2013). Measuring and differentiating perceptions of supervisor and top leader ethics. Journal of Business Ethics, 113(3), 415-428. doi:10.1007/s10551-012-1312-8S

Introduction

The ethics concept defines the acceptable morally upright way in a society. In essence, ethics deals with all the values that define an individual’s sense of purity including his or her particular intentions (Prince, 2008). This means that ethics plays a critical role of providing guidelines needed for analyzing what is right or wrong in particular scenarios. The study analyzes three articles that correlate ethics with leadership. The most common idea reflected in the three articles is the fact that ethics defines a leader’s specific identity as well as his or her role. For this reason, ethical theories mainly tend to discuss two main items. The main issues and themes discussed in the three articles are ethics, behavior and action of leaders followed by a leader’s character or personality. This paper will analyze these three articles, exploring how ethics are essential towards leadership or the role of leadership.

A critical role played by a leader is influencing or driving subordinates towards all processes that ultimately achieve common goals (Hassan, Mahsud, Yukl & Prussia, 2013). This is in various cases that include organizational quest, teamwork or a specific project. This means that a leader has the ethical duty of treating his subordinates with respect as every individual has unique personality and character. In addition, the ethical environment in a particular organization is established and built by leaders since they possess an influential role or responsibility in their specific organization. Besides, leaders are known to have an influential responsibility in the process of developing organizational values (Hassan et al., 2013).

In most organizations, the immediate supervisors to organizational employees are assumed the organization’s primary representatives. In this regard, such leaders tend to provide important roles such as feedback, daily direction, information regarding job descriptions, work groups as well as evaluation processes to organizational employees (Kotlke & Pelletier, 2013). Research studies have indicated several occasions where differences emerge in regards to the level of satisfaction or trust with immediate top executives or supervisors. This means that organizational employees tend to evaluate their leaders based on their ethical tendencies. Such differences are then indicated in specific organizationally relevant outcomes that are personal such as in both organizational citizenship and commitment.

Themes addressed in all of the Articles

The articles suggest that leaders’ level of integrity, honesty as well as trustworthiness are critical factors in predicting leadership effectiveness. Conceptualized ethical leadership is a demonstration to every normal and appropriate factor critical in conducting interpersonal relationships and personal actions (Kotlke & Pelletier, 2013). In addition, they play leading roles in promoting effective conducts in relevant followers through an established two-way communication, decision-making as well as reinforcement. The articles have also established the fact that ethical leadership is a composition of certain behaviors and traits.

In this regard, morally upright leaders are assumed sincere and principle based individuals who are able to care about their subordinates’, society’s and followers’ wellbeing.

Proactively, ethical leaders tend try to establish transformative processes in their subordinates through effective communication strategies as far as their ethical standards are concerned (Ciulla, 2004). This is modeling ethical behaviors that suggest that their subordinates or followers ought to be held accountable for their ethical actions or behaviors.

These articles also suggest that organization’s success is primarily based on the leader’s ability to foster an ethical culture in his or her organization. This is mainly achieved by the ability of articulating organizational values in an effective manner with the main aim of developing the subordinate’s moral culture by effectively implementing the strategies as well as tactics that are morally appropriate. Moreover, effective ethical leadership entails offering any support systems or mechanisms to employees when they are faced with challenges besides ethical dilemmas. The process is complemented by a leader’s ability to respond to any ethical misconduct in a timely fashion. This means that ethical leadership is composed with implementations of any processes that make ethics to be an organization’s top priority (Pelletier, 2013). Previous studies established that ethical leadership was a potential condition in regards to the effectiveness of an ethical program.

Ethical use of Power, Authority, Persuasion, and/or Motivation

It is important to note that differentiated perceptions normally vary from one employee to the other. Moreover, they may have significant implications on how ethical lapses may be avoided or eliminated in an organization. For instance, there have been suggestions that lower levels organizations face situation and abstract ethical dilemmas. This means that universal ethical codes may result to an impediment towards any good ethical decisions at such levels of an organization (Ciulla, 2004). Organizational employees at lower levels may also hold their supervisors or leaders to a universal code of ethics. However, they may also recognize that their own leaders or supervisors possess an ambiguous situation that is unique and which they have to cope with. In addition, any form of education or training in regards to ethical awareness, decision-making and knowledge may be found to be fundamentally different at lower employee levels relative to top leadership levels.

Empowering and ethical leader behaviors are mainly associated with relationships found to be high-quality leader affiliate exchange (LMX) (Hassan et al., 2013). There is increased likelihood that such relationships are founded on mutual liking, trust and respect. Various research studies based on LMX have been able to establish that most leaders possessing favourable exchange relationships and have the likelihood to be assumed more effective stimulate efficient sub-ordinate commitment. This is as opposed to leaders with exchange relationships that are negative or unfavorable. However, it is worth noting that previous studies did not seek to explore or investigate ethical or empowering leadership as a form of behavioral practice that is distinct and related to LMX (Hassan et al., 2013). This is despite the fact that such a relationship has a direct impact towards effective subordinate commitment as well as perceptions in regards to specific leader effectiveness in a variety of ways.

Most organizations tended to consider ethics programs as effective only when leaders were able to promote the culture of ethical dialog. This is because such a process resulted to the creation of a working environment of trust as well as the provision to resources that enabled the development of ethical decisions in an organization (Prince, 2008). The articles indicate that the process of seeking a social legitimacy is closely followed by the ability of organizational leaders to enhance an ethical culture. This is mainly when such organizations are faced with ethical misconducts at any level of leadership. In essence, ethical leadership is a critical tool towards the process of complementing decision-making processes, ethical codes as well as in obtaining organizational resources, which are essential to the process of achieving an ethical organizational culture.

 

References

Ciulla B. J. (2004). Ethics, the Heart of Leadership. London. Greenwood Publishing Inc.

Hassan S.,  Mahsud R.,  Yukl G. &  Prussia E. G. , (2013),”Ethical and empoweringleadership and leader effectiveness”, Journal of Managerial Psychology, Vol. 28 Iss 2 pp. 133 – 146Permanent link to this document:http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/02683941311300252

Pelletier K. (2013). Measuring and Differentiating Perceptions of Supervisor and Top Leader Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics. March 2013. DOI: 10.1007/s10551-012-1312-8

Prince. L. T. (2008). Leadership Ethics: An Introduction. London. Cambridge University Press.

Kottke, J., & Pelletier, K. (2013). Measuring and differentiating perceptions of supervisor and top leader ethics. Journal of Business Ethics, 113(3), 415-428. doi:10.1007/s10551-012-1312-8S

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GWEXDDSRGCF10” for 10% discount