Locarno Agreements

Locarno Agreements

Locarno Agreements refer a set of treaties conferred at Locarno, Switzerland late 1925 and later on signed in London on December the same year. The reason for the agreements was to free the settlements created after war from attack or danger and maintain peace with Germany. The master plan that would lead to attainment of what each country wanted, that is, Germany, Britain, Italy, France and Belgium led to formulation of treaties.[1] The first treaty was considered the most important which advocate for an assurance of peace between/among countries bordering each other; the second and third treaties advocated for the resolution of dispute between Germany and Belgium, Germany and France hence creating a great future.

The fourth and fifth were conflict resolution treaties between Germany and Poland, Germany and Czechoslovakia. Germany would pay some amount to compensate for their past transgressions.[2] Due to the continued success of the Locarno agreements; Germany was grant entrance into the League of Nations as a permanent member of the counsel. The main goals of Britain included advocating for peace between France and Germany, which would lead to France foregoing their alliances which would lead to the country conforming to the demands of Germany. Britain wanted its Locarno objective to be met through the revision of land boundaries in Eastern Europe in that Germany will gain more than France.

The main agreement that was final at Locarno was the Rhineland Pact between Germany, France, Belgium, United Kingdom and Italy.[3] Germany was added more land and its border extended. The countries were therefore not supposed to attack each other. Germany assented with the conflict resolution assemblies with France and Belgium and also to the agreements signed with Poland and Czechoslovakia. In addition, France signed agreements with Poland and Czechoslovakia which implored for help in case it conflicted with Germany. Locarno agreements hence helped to ameliorate the political differences in Western Europe. There was also anticipation of peace in future.[4] The Locarno agreements were however weakened by the Franco-Soviet Treaty of Mutual Assistance in 1935.

Bibliography

Duroselle, Jean-Baptiste. “The Spirit of Locarno: Illusions of Pactomania.” Foreign Affairs 50, no. 4 (1972): 752-764.

Jacobson, Jon. Locarno diplomacy: Germany and the west, 1925-1929. Princeton University Press, 2015.

Wandycz, Piotr Stefan. The twilight of French eastern alliances, 1926-1936: French-Czechoslovak-Polish relations from Locarno to the remilitarization of the Rhineland. Princeton University Press, 2014.

 

 

[1] Carr, Edward Hallett. International relations between the two world wars, 1919-1939. Macmillan, 1947.

[2] Duroselle, Jean-Baptiste. “The Spirit of Locarno: Illusions of Pactomania.” Foreign Affairs 50, no. 4 (1972): 752-764

[3] Wandycz, Piotr Stefan. The twilight of French eastern alliances, 1926-1936: French-Czechoslovak-Polish relations from Locarno to the remilitarization of the Rhineland. Princeton University Press, 2014

[4] Ibid

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