Napoleonic Wars

Introduction

Napoleonic Wars strategy and tactics were akin to the tactics employed by Westerners during the war. The predominant tactics and strategies were designed to attack their enemies at their weakest point. The Napoleon won almost all the wars that his troop were involved in. The carder’s victory has been a matter of interest by innumerable scholars[1]. As a result, multiple types of research were conducted, and they discovered that some strategies and tactics resembled the ones used by westerners. In this chapter, we look at the similarities between the western and Napoleon warfare.

Argument

The war of the West tactics and strategies were preeminent employed during the First World War in 1911 to 1918. Various scholars view the First World War as a fatal war since the Napoleonic wars[2]. Additionally, the First World War employed tactics, strategies, and weapons, which were traced back to the incumbency of Napoleon. The westerners embraced Napoleonic strategies and tactics, which were reflected in the warfare against the eastern bloc.

The western bloc encompassed European countries rambled from Belgium to Luxembourg. Both western and Napoleon warfare had a great impact on European countries such as Belgium. Belgium was involved in Napoleonic wars as well as western warfare[3]. During the First World War, soldiers from the western region borrowed tactics from the Napoleon era, which enabled them to be victorious in Napoleonic warfare. However, the capitalists emerged as superpowers during the Second World War. Western warfare showed resemblance to the Napoleonic warfare regarding the firearms and the weaponry machines used. The Napoleonic war took place a century ago before the emergence of the First World War[4]. The soldiers emulated the weapons and the strategies, which were applied against the French during the Napoleonic war. However, arms were slightly improved to a great level, which was targeted to vanquish the eastern bloc. For instance, the firearms used during the Napoleonic war was advanced to new and powerful versions, which were more efficient.

According to Parker, the westerners ever existed in harmony, and therefore in times of war, all the active people got together in readiness for war. The group developed self-drive and motivation to face the opponent, Similarly the Napoleons as well had the spirit of working together with great self-motivation. With one-goal and high motivations, both were able to overcome their enemies[5].

Enough evidence has been presented by critiques to make it believe that the weapons that were used by the Western Front were very similar to those that were employed by the Napoleonic battalion in a siege against the Eurasian Countries[6]. The plans, designs, and patterns of firearms, for example, the rifles can be traced back by historiographers to the Napoleon age. There was also a noticeable advancement in the level of technology used hence indicating a stable difference in development. This is evident in the functionality of the firearms of the First World War shooting multiple rounds of ammunitions per minute, with larger recoil speed and superior focusing ability[7]. The drive for the designs was based on Napoleonic war.

Another resemblance of western warfare and Napoleon war was based on communication technology. According to John Elting, he said that Napoleon and its staff members depended on the long-distance communication system. The semaphore developed consisted of a tower from which rose a 30-foot with mobile woody crosspiece, which was pivoted at its top. The Telegraph resembled letter T and was painted in black to ensure visibility[8]. The device sent one letter at a time when composing a message. In favorable weather, the sign could be posted for about 94km in 5 minutes. The Chappe telegram was actively seen in the invasion of Italy. Latter, Swedes and British invented their telegraphs but were slower and less advanced technology wise. The western block emulates use of Chappe telegraphs during the first-word war to communicate. In this reign, the Chappe telegraphs were more modified to deliver faster.

During the world war one, telephones and telegraph were commonly used for telecommunication. However, radio communication took over; the technologies advanced for use on the front and would result into the development of the broadcast radio in the 1920s. Later, secure telephone lines were developed which passed on the wires on the ground. The invention continued due to the demand of the advancing technology, and more powerful communication devices were developed[9].

In addition, another distinct facet that was embraced by the Westerners, which indicated a striking resemblance that can be identified with the Napoleonic Warfare, was the schemes and strategies used in the war, where, the Napoleon was known for his war policies that included attacking and striking the enemy centrally[10]. The move later made him employ their most robust and able army men who take positions in defensive last line. Upon dampening the antagonists, a full attack overall teams was launched. Evasive actions and deceptions were employed to facilitate the full attack of the enemy. Such measures and techniques were understood to completely weaken and destroy the energy and efforts of the stations under siege[11]. The scenario resulted to a rapid ruination of the opponents as a result of impulsiveness. Essential, utilitarian and similar basics of the Napoleonic strategies were inherited by the Western Front to resist and fight the invading Germany army during the First World War phenomenon[12]. Large number of Germans was against the

Refutation

While majority held it that the fighting criterion applied by the Westerners were too much similar, other historians believed that there was no similarity between the Westerners and the Napoleonic strategies. To them, they claimed that the wars having taken place in too far much different times and in variable circumstances then there was no way any link or any association could have existed between the two war strategies[13]. In spite of that fact, the French army was led by the Napoleon, and since it is one of the Western Europe countries that believed to ultimately share common attributes in that geographical region, then, definite similarities persisted between the wars strategies applied.

Conclusively, the Western war tactics were convincingly identical to those adopted by the Napoleon, the only factor being the changing of the technology and modernization. The most likelihood is that the methods applied by the Westerners during the First World War ameliorated and were later employed by the Napoleons. In all the cases, the employment succeeded.

 

Bibliography

Bonura, M. A. “A French Way of Warfare.” Under the Shadow of Napoleon, 2012, 11-40. doi:10.18574/nyu/9780814709429.003.0002.

Creveld, M. V. “Napoleon and the Dawn of Operational Warfare.” The Evolution of Operational Art, 2010, 9-32. doi:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199599486.003.0002.

Dodge, T. A. Warfare in the age of Napoleon: 4. London: Leonaur, 2011.

 

[1] A. Bonura, “A French Way of Warfare,” Under the Shadow of Napoleon, 2012, xx, doi:10.18574/nyu/9780814709429.003.0002.

[2] Bonura, “Shadow of Napoleon,” 45-34.

[3] Bonura, “Shadow of Napoleon,” 45-34.

[4] M. V. Creveld, “Napoleon and the Dawn of Operational Warfare,” The Evolution of Operational Art, 2010, 23-34, doi:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199599486.003.0002.

[5] Creveld, “Operational Warfare,” 23-34.

[6] T. A. Dodge, Warfare in the age of Napoleon: 4 (London: Leonaur, 2011), 36-45.

[7] M. A. Bonura, “A French Way of Warfare,” Under the Shadow of Napoleon, 2012, 45-34, doi:10.18574/nyu/9780814709429.003.0002.

[8] M. A. Bonura, “A French Way of Warfare,” Under the Shadow of Napoleon, 2012, 45-34, doi:10.18574/nyu/9780814709429.003.0002.

[9] Bonura, “Shadow of Napoleon,” 45-34.

[10] Bonura, “Shadow of Napoleon,” 45-34.

[11] M. V. Creveld, “Napoleon and the Dawn of Operational Warfare,” The Evolution of Operational Art, 2010, 23-34, doi:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199599486.003.0002.

[12] Creveld, “Operational Warfare,” 23-34.

[13] T. A. Dodge, Warfare in the age of Napoleon: 4 (London: Leonaur, 2011), 36-45.

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