police in controlling crime

Are Police Effective in Controlling Crime

Ariel, B., & Partridge, H. (2017). Predictable policing: Measuring the crime control benefits of hotspots policing at bus stops. Journal of Quantitative Criminology, 33(4), 809-833.

The source talks about how predictable policing is effective by manning hotspots. The source explains how effective the police have been able to reduce criminal activities through the identification of major crime hotspots and concentrating on dealing with the criminals. The source is therefore important in the research as it will be used to support arguments that police are effective in controlling crime.

Bayley, D. H., & Weisburd, D. (2009). Cops and spooks: The role of police in counterterrorism. In To protect and to serve (pp. 81-99). Springer New York.

The source explains the critical role that the police play in fighting terrorism. The source acknowledges that the police have been involved in gathering intelligence and neutralizing terrorist threats. From the source, it emerges that police through regular patrols are better placed to detect terrorist threats. The source is vital in the research as it demonstrates the role of the police in fighting crime.

Braga, A. A., & Weisburd, D. L. (2015). Police innovation and crime prevention: Lessons learned from police research over the past 20 years.

The source explores new innovations that have been implemented in policing and explores whether they have been effective in crime control. The source addresses the shortcomings of community policing that have led to the police becoming ineffective in preventing criminal activities from taking place. The source also explains that community policing should engage the community in defining the problems and therefore has resulted to the police being forced to address some problems that do not fit in their traditional roles and they cannot be addressed through the conventional law enforcement that the police officers are familiar with. The source therefore shows some of the challenges that may be making the police ineffective in controlling crime. The source is relevant to the topic of police controlling crime and will be used to show if their challenges are addressed they have the capacity to control crime.

Chaney, C., & Robertson, R. V. (2013). Racism and police brutality in America. Journal of African American Studies, 17(4), 480-505.

The source explores serious allegations that the general public have making against the police including accusing the police officers committing serious crimes like murder. The source reveals that most of the respondents can relate to police brutality as they have witnessed it at some point in their lives. The source therefore illustrates that because the police officers commonly get involves in unlawful activities like beating up individuals, they have failed to win the public confidence and therefore cannot control crime. The source is critical to the research and will be useful in showing why it has been almost impossible for the police to control crime.

Chiras, D., & Crea, D. (2004). Do police reduce crime? Estimates using the allocation of police forces after a terrorist attack. The American Economic Review, 94(1), 115-133.

The source used data to demonstrate the relationship between the presence of the police and the reduction in the number of specific criminal activities. Through analysis of data of the increase of the number of police in areas that are exposed to specific crimes, the source explains that police presence creates unfavorable conditions for criminals to operate in. The source is related to the topic of discussion and will be used to argue that without the police criminals are unmanageable.

Eterno, J. A., & Silverman, E. B. (2006). The New York City police department’s Compstat: dream or nightmare?. International Journal of Police Science & Management, 8(3), 218-231.

The source agrees that the police in New York have been able to significantly reduce the crime rate. The source however brings to light that most police officers continue to engage in some illegal activities especially when asked by their superiors. By engaging in such activities the police fail in their duty of fully controlling crime. The source will be used to argue that although the police are effective in controlling crime, continuous reforms are necessary.

Lawton, B. A., Taylor, R. B., & Luongo, A. J. (2005). Police officers on drug corners in Philadelphia, drug crime, and violent crime: Intended, diffusion, and displacement impacts. Justice Quarterly, 22(4), 427-451.

The source explains how major police operation targeting a specific crime like the sale of illegal drugs can have a positive impact to the reduction of overall crimes. The example given on the operation in Philadelphia is proof that police play a critical role in controlling crime. The source is connected to the topic of discussion and will be used to further demonstrate the effectiveness of police operations.

Reiman, J., & Leighton, P. (2015). The rich get richer and the poor get prison: Ideology, class, and criminal justice. Routledge.

The source explains how the police have failed in controlling the crime committed by the rich and powerful people but instead chosen to target the poor who usually end up in jails. The source explains that despite white collar crime being a serious issue, the criminals that are involved in the white collar crime are less often prosecuted or pursued by the police when compared to ordinary citizens who commit less serious criminal offences. The source explains that the police have failed in controlling white collar crimes because an excuse is usually created there is no direct personal injury involved when compared to other crimes like robbery with violence where terrifying personal injuries are common. The source is useful in demonstrating how the police have failed in their duty of controlling crime.

Tyler, T. R., Jackson, J., & Mentovich, A. (2015). The consequences of being an object of suspicion: Potential pitfalls of proactive police contact. Journal of Empirical Legal Studies, 12(4), 602-636.

The source acknowledges that major changes have taken place within the police department allowing the police to be more effective crime when compared to the past. However, the source identifies lack of trust between the public and police being a major issue that the police must address to become completely effective in controlling crime. The source shows some studies that reveal that in instances where the citizens are not treated with suspicion, they are always ready to assist the police but when treated with suspicion they always avoid any encounter with the police even where they may have useful information that may help in an investigation. The source is critical to explaining why the police are failing in bringing the crime rate to zero.

Weisburd, D., & Eck, J. E. (2004). What can police do to reduce crime, disorder, and fear?. The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 593(1), 42-65.

The source explains how changes in the police have enabled the police to be more effective in controlling crime when compared to the past where a standard model was used by t and rendered them less effective. The source further suggests that the numbers of available police agencies matter in controlling crime and that, if all police were withdrawn crime cases are likely to rise. The source also states that the introduction of rapid response calls has been successful in crime control. The source is relevant in the research as it will be used to demonstrate that crimes cannot be controlled in the absence of the police.

References

Ariel, B., & Partridge, H. (2017). Predictable policing: Measuring the crime control benefits of hotspots policing at bus stops. Journal of Quantitative Criminology, 33(4), 809-833.

Bayley, D. H., & Weisburd, D. (2009). Cops and spooks: The role of police in counterterrorism. In To protect and to serve (pp. 81-99). Springer New York.

Braga, A. A., & Weisburd, D. L. (2015). Police innovation and crime prevention: Lessons learned from police research over the past 20 years.

Chaney, C., & Robertson, R. V. (2013). Racism and police brutality in America. Journal of African American Studies, 17(4), 480-505.

Chiras, D., & Crea, D. (2004). Do police reduce crime? Estimates using the allocation of police forces after a terrorist attack. The American Economic Review, 94(1), 115-133.

Eterno, J. A., & Silverman, E. B. (2006). The New York City police department’s Compstat: dream or nightmare?. International Journal of Police Science & Management, 8(3), 218-231.

Lawton, B. A., Taylor, R. B., & Luongo, A. J. (2005). Police officers on drug corners in Philadelphia, drug crime, and violent crime: Intended, diffusion, and displacement impacts. Justice Quarterly, 22(4), 427-451.

Reiman, J., & Leighton, P. (2015). The rich get richer and the poor get prison: Ideology, class, and criminal justice. Routledge.

Tyler, T. R., Jackson, J., & Mentovich, A. (2015). The consequences of being an object of suspicion: Potential pitfalls of proactive police contact. Journal of Empirical Legal Studies, 12(4), 602-636.

Weisburd, D., & Eck, J. E. (2004). What can police do to reduce crime, disorder, and fear?. The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 593(1), 42-65.

 

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