Puerto Rico

Puerto Rico

Keith Hilliard

Months after Hurricane Irma ravaged the island of Puerto Rico; authorities scramble to restore electricity to hospitals, businesses and hundreds of thousands of residents amid the widespread power outages across the island.   At a time when Puerto Rico struggles to meet basic needs, its cash-strapped economy competes for emergency funding against Texas and, potentially, an Irma-stricken Florida.   The U.S. territory of 3.4 million residents, electrical grid took the brunt of the storm while downed power lines caused 63 percent of the island’s 1.5 million power clients still without electricity.  Because of downed trees and debris, many roadways blocked to maintenance efforts, as officials warned that the recovery of power to the Island’s residents could take months, according to (WYSS, 2017).

Amid the disaster, the island of Puerto Rico residents are without, the essentials of daily life.  With the power grid impacted, almost every form of productivity has ceased in Puerto Rico.  Whether its businesses, manufacturing plants, schools, hospitals, or homes, which require electricity has stopped, function because of the electrical power grid and distribution systems outage.  Moreover, maintenance work, food, fresh water, gasoline, all needed for quick recovery was in short supply.  Other challenges because of Hurricane Irma damage is the recovery of communications on the island.

Although Hurricane Irma’s landfall on the island of Puerto Rico was not avoidable, the impact and mitigation of energy-related sectors and a recoverable power grid and distribution were mostly possible.  As such, the following measure could have mitigated the effects of Hurricane Irma and shorten restoration and recovery:

  • Routine inspections of power stations, and develop grid backup and recovery plans;
  • Regular reviews of water filtration facilities, and improve backup and recovery strategies;
  • Ensure that trees were routinely cut back and cleared away from power lines;
  • Establish back up supplies of water, food, blanks, batteries, flashlights and other essentials needed for natural hazard preparedness;
  • Develop redundant communication networks and routine inspections of grid distribution systems;
  • Re-evaluate emergency protection planning, restoration, and recovery planning;
  • Develop strategies to reduce threat and vulnerability to natural hazards and effect to the energy sector.

Works Cited

WYSS, J. (2017, September 8). Puerto Rico assessing Hurricane Irma damage amid widespread power outage. Retrieved November 23, 2017, from Miamiherald.com: http://www.miamiherald.com/news/weather/hurricane/article172023172.html

Keith Hilliard

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GWEXDDSRGCF10” for 10% discount