Role of slavery in the Development of the United States

Role of slavery in the Development of the United States

Introduction

Servitude in the Unites States of America was a permissible undertaking of Human Chattel enslavement. The individuals who fell culprits to slavery were mainly Africans and African Americans. [1]Servitude played an immense role in making United States a powerhouse economically until 1789, which marked the writing of U.S constitution. A growing body of research alludes to the fact that the migration and subsequent cruel handling of slaves for example in American cotton fields was integral to development of United States[2].

Discussion

Servitude in United Sates commenced around the period 1619 when the maiden slaves arrived in Jamestown the North American colony. The slavery from and during the founding of the original 13 colonies contributed to development of united states by aiding in production of lucrative crops such as Tobacco which impacted the U.S economy positively[3]. The servitude transpired throughout the American colonies from the 16th century. During this period, the slaves contributed to development of America by building economic base of the newly founded nation[4]. The able men taken to America to serve as slaves helped build America by providing cheap labour in the tobacco, indigo and rice plantations in the North.

The slavery led to an exponential growth and expansion of America. The enslaved Africans and African Americans supplied labour in agricultural plantations as well as in other capacities[5]. America developed following the enslavement of Africans who led to thriving of the new nation by working as butlers, launderers, house cleaners, waiters and tailors. Moreover, the slaves served as grooms, carriage drivers, carpenters, artisans, hosterls, blacksmiths, spinners, milers and stonemasons. [6]The freely offered labour force resulted to substantial growth and development of America.

America also developed because of the fact that the enslaved individuals also worked in urban areas. Credible research suffices evidence that more than 10% of slaves had their duties posted in cities of the United States. Slaves contributed to development by rendering labour in public work projects and industrial enterprises consequently resulting to massive growth.  The plantations economy where individual slaves worked formed the larger American national economy. [7]The hardworking slaves led to proclamation of cotton as king in the south of the new nation. The cotton plantations formed a robust foundation of the antebellum southern economy. Slave labour led to rise and massive growth of American shipping and financial industries. The two sectors were also heavily reliant on slave labour.

The cheap and inexpensive labour provided by enslaved Africans became pivotal and served as political and economic capital in the American political economy. The enslaved African also served as collateral in various kind of business transactions[8]. The slaves were traded traded for exchange of goods and services. The scenario expanded the American economy. [9]The individuals held as slaves would be used to purchase more land and settle outstanding loans. The transactions and exchanges formed the basis of tax revenue for local and state government further contributing to development of American economy. [10]However, in 1789, the U.S constitution came to being, but although it did not expressly abolish slave trade, the constitution included provisions about free persons. Conclusively, the slave trade undertaking was core to the American economic and political life.

Bibliography

Anderson, Fred. The War That Made America: A Short History of the French and Indian   War. New York: Penguin Books, 2006.

Cave, Alfred A. The French and Indian War. Westport, Conn: Greenwood Press, 2004.

Fisher, Laura, and Et Al. The war that made America. 2006.

Keene, Jennifer D., Saul Cornell, and Edward T. O’Donnell. Visions of America: A History of       the United States. Boston: Pearson, 2012.

[1] Fred Anderson, The War That Made America: A Short History of the French and Indian War (New York: Penguin Books, 2006), 35-58.

[2] Anderson, the War That Made America, 35-58.

[3] Anderson, the War That Made America, 35-58.

[4] Anderson, the War That Made America, 35-58.

[5] Alfred A Cave, the French and Indian War (Westport, Conn: Greenwood Press, 2004), 67-78.

[6] Cave, the French and Indian War, 67-78.

[7] Cave, the French and Indian War, 67-78.

[8] Cave, the French and Indian War, 67-78.

[9] Laura Fisher and Et Al, The war that made America (2006), 112-123.

[10] Jennifer D. Keene, Saul Cornell, and Edward T. O’Donnell, Visions of America: A History of the United States (Boston: Pearson, 2012), 89-95.

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